The New Immigration Federalism (Sesión en ingles)

Karthick Ramakrishnan is professor of public policy and political science at the University of California, Riverside. His research focuses on civic participation, immigration policy, and the politics of race, ethnicity, and immigration in the United States. Ramakrishnan directs the National Asian American Survey and is founder of AAPIdata.com, which seeks to make policy-relevant data on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders more accessible to a variety of audiences. He is currently writing two books on immigration policy, and is founding editor of the Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Politics, an official section journal of the American Political Science Association.

(Deep) Pratheepan  Gulesekaram, University of Santa Clara  teaches Constitutional Law and Immigration Law and is well published on the topics of immigration federalism and the constitutional rights of noncitizens. His research currently focuses on the political and legal dynamics of state and local immigration regulations, including their constitutionality and their effect on federal immigration lawmaking.  He has also extensively explored the relationship between the Second Amendment and noncitizens, as a way of understanding constitutional protections for noncitizens. He is a frequent media commentator on issues of state and local immigration laws, comprehensive immigration reform, same-sex marriage, the first amendment, and equality concerns.

 

The New Immigration Federalism

 

Since 2004, the United States has seen a flurry of state and local laws dealing with unauthorized immigrants. Though initially restrictionist, these laws have recently undergone a dramatic shift toward promoting integration. How are we to make sense of this new immigration federalism? What are its causes? And what are its consequences for the federal-state balance of power? In The New Immigration Federalism, Professors

Pratheepan Gulasekaram and S. Karthick Ramakrishnan provide answers to these questions using a mix of quantitative, historical, and doctrinal legal analysis. In so doing they refute the popular “demographic necessity” argument put forward by anti-immigrant activists and politicians. Instead, they posit that immigration federalism is rooted in a political process that connects both federal and subfederal actors: the Polarized Change Model. Their model captures not only the spread of restrictionist legislation but also its abrupt turnaround in 2012, projecting valuable insights for the future.

9a. Sesión

Viernes 16 de octubre - 12:00 Hrs.

Ponente(s):
Karthick Ramakrishnan
University of California, Riverside
"The New Immigration Federalism (Sesión en ingles)"
 
(Deep) Pratheepan Gulesekaram
University of Santa Clara




 

Analizando Las Migraciones Internacionales Desde 1998

Seminario creado por El Colegio de la Frontera Norte

Carretera Escénica Tijuana - Ensenada, Km 18.5, San Antonio del Mar, 22560 Tijuana, Baja California, México.

Mayores informes

sepmig@colef.mx
Tel.: +52 01(664) 631 6300 Ext. 1461

En Redes Sociales

Seminario creado por El Colegio de la Frontera Norte

Carretera Escénica Tijuana - Ensenada, Km 18.5, San Antonio del Mar, 22560 Tijuana, Baja California, México.
sepmig@colef.mx
Tel.: +52 01(664) 631 6300 Ext. 1461